Earlier Works


A piece of matai, a yellow close-grained native timber was used to carve two blades of equal length. I was inspired by the wood's natural beauty and called the two swords Castor and Pollux. More


The shape, colour and markings of the woods used for this sword gave it a Celtic flavour. This led me to name the sword Beowulf. . More

The red beech used to make the blade for this sword was carved from an old fence post. The post had been discarded and had found itself in Lake Wakatipu. Later it was salvaged from the shores of the lake and hence came into my posession.

The blade is based on the typical shape of a Viking sax of the 9th. century. The sax only served to reinforce the already fearsome reputation associated with the Vikings. Like a huge carving knife, it had a curved sharpened edge and a flattened back which met at a point. The sax was the forerunner of the falchion which in turn gave rise to the sabre.
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A single piece of red beech was used to carve two blades of equal length. First a blade based on a 9th. century Viking sax which I called Odin and second, this blade, typical of a 13th. century falchion a descendant of the sax and similar to one held in the Library, Durham Cathedral. This sword just had to be named Thor.More

SOLD. A piece of driftwood salvaged from the shore of Lake Wakatipu at Kingston turned out to contain the tough hardwood, red beech. The worked and finished wood revealed spectacular wavy grain which, dependent on the angle of light changes in hue. This blade was the first long blade (35 inches) I had carved and can be catergorised as a long sword or war sword. I named the sword Merlin (the magician in the legend of King Arthur) because the blade's colour and grain seemed to possess a magical quality. More

SOLD. This was the second blade in which I carved a fuller or 'blood channel' as it is usually called. A fuller was designed to strengthen and lighten the blade, it had nothing to do with blood. The wood was hard to work but it cut cleanly and the richness of its colour made for a satisfying result. More

The shape of Falcon's blade was based on the 'Sword of Charlemagne' c. 850 A.D housed in the Waffensammlung in Vienna. It is typical of an eastern European falchion. This blade is single edge with a subtle s-curved flat back which meets the edge at a point. Falchions were preceded by the Viking sax, a sword which resembled a huge carving knife. They were also the forerunner of the modern day sabre. More

The falchion was the forerunner of the Viking sax which looked like a huge carving knife, it, in turn preceded the sabre. The blade was carved from a piece of macrocarpa which is a good carving wood. This wood is one of the most underated of all the woods here in New Zealand. It can be seen to have a rich light brown colour with good grain and markings.More


This is the first blade in which I carved a fuller. The fuller, frequently called the 'blood channel' is that channel which runs from the cross-guard towards the point along the flat surface of the blade. It was designed to lighten and strengthen the blade, it had nothing to do with blood. Blades of this length, 34 inches, just slightly longer than average, placed them in the long sword or war sword category. They could, consequently, be used by a knight on horseback giving the rider that much needed extra reach

Swords which had an almost parallel sided blade for about 2/3 of its length, then tapering to a point were in use during the 11th. and 12th. centuries. Similar shaped blades were also used by the Vikings in the 9th.century. Swords of this type usually contained a fuller, more commonly called the 'blood channel'. However Amorra has been given a blade section of the flattened hexagon type in order to accentuate the colour and grain of the wood.. More


The falchion was the forerunner of the Viking sax which looked like a huge carving knife, it, in turn preceded the sabre.

The blade was carved from a piece of macrocarpa which is a good carving wood. This wood is one of the most underated of all the woods here in New Zealand. It can be seen to have a rich light brown colour with good grain and markings.More